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For other questions about free trade agreements, E-Mail-export2fta@customs.govt.nz – we will endeavour to respond to emails within 48 hours. The Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership is the first free trade agreement between Asia, the Pacific and America. A Sustainable Impact Assessment (AIS) has been launched to support free trade negotiations. The ASA will assess the potential impact of the trade and trade provisions of the proposed free trade agreement on economic, social, human rights and environmental elements in any trading partner and in other countries concerned. For more information on Sia, please visit the ASA EU-New Zealand website. Trade agreements and closer economic partnerships are an important part of New Zealand`s international trade policy. We are using closer trade agreements and economic partnerships to liberalize trade. New Zealand`s economy is a market economy heavily dependent on international trade, particularly with Australia, the United States of America, China and Japan. It is highly dependent on tourism and agricultural exports and has only small manufacturing and high-tech components. Market economic reforms in recent decades have removed many barriers to foreign investment, and the World Bank has made New Zealand the most business-friendly country in the world [1]. Regional and bilateral free trade agreements have become an important part of New Zealand`s international trade policy.

New Zealand has used free trade agreements, also known as closer economic partnerships, to liberalize trade between economies. A closer economic partnership agreement with Thailand was negotiated in 2004 and implemented in 2005. Negotiations for a free trade agreement with Chile, Brunei and Singapore, known as the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership, were concluded in 2005. Negotiations on other agreements with Malaysia began in 2006, but could not be concluded. The historic free trade agreement with China was signed in Beijing in April 2008. [2] The South Pacific Regional Trade and Economic Cooperation Agreement (SPARTECA) is a non-reciprocal trade agreement in which NZ (with Australia) proposes preferential tariff treatment for certain products that are the production or production of Pacific Islands Forum countries (known as the Forum Island Countries). For NZ products exported to an Island Country Forum, there is no preferential rate. Some trade agreements have provisions for trade mitigation measures. Singapore is also a party to the ASEAN-Australia Free Trade Agreement (AANZFTA), the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership (P4) and the Trans-Pacific Trans-Pacific Partnership (PPTPP). The rules of origin of the new ANZSCEP protocol contain the largest number of provisions facilitating trade in these agreements and incorporate them into the new CSR timetable as part of the protocol.

Revised rules of origin for trans-Tasman trade came into effect on September 1, 2011. For more information on the rules of origin for ANCERTA and general instructions for using the agreement, see fact sheet 20 (PDF 268 KB). More information can also be found on the MFAT website. Austrade has detailed information on activities in New Zealand and in ASEAN countries: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. New Zealand is at the forefront of global initiatives that show how trade can support broader environmental and sustainable development goals. The NZ-Malaysia Free Trade Agreement includes trade in goods and services as well as investments in one of our fastest growing export markets.